Achieving SDGs with Qualified Teachers

Achieving SDGs with Qualified Teachers

Sanjay Mohan Marale & Riya Sharma

Target 4.c

By 2030, substantially increase the supply of qualified teachers
Indicator 4.c.1: 

The proportion of teachers with the minimum required qualifications, by
educational level 

Introduction

Article 26, the universal declaration of human rights states that “Everyone HAS THE RIGHT
TO EDUCATION”.The importance of learning is to enable the individual to put his potential
to optimal use. Education makes a man a right thinker and a correct decision-maker. It
achieves this by bringing him knowledge from the external world, teaching him to reason,
and acquainting him with past history, so that he can be a better judge of the present.

 

The International Journal of Human Rights recognize education as intrinsically valuable as humankind’s most effective tool for personal empowerment. Education takes on the status of a human right because it is integral to and enhances human dignity through its fruits of knowledge, wisdom and understanding.

Education is the very prerequisite for the individual to function fully as a human being in modern society.

In positing a human right to education, the framers of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) axiomatically relied on the notion that education is not value-neutral. In this spirit, Article 26 lays out a set of educational goals analyzed including education about human rights in the Article 26.

Article 26, the universal declaration of human rights states that “Everyone HAS THE RIGHT
TO EDUCATION”. The importance of learning is to enable the individual to put his potential to optimal use. Education makes a man a right thinker and a correct decision-maker. It achieves this by bringing him knowledge from the external world, teaching him to reason,and acquainting him with past history, so that he can be a better judge of the present.
Education improves living conditions, offers opportunities, and contributes to the economic and social development of a country. Its contribution to peace and sustainability has been underlined by the sustainable development goals, with the dedicated Goal-4 which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and lifelong learning opportunities for all
however despite staggering progress accomplished regarding access to education, 262 million
children and youth are out of school according to the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (U.I.S.)
Moreover out of those enrolled 617 million children and adolescents nearly 60% globally
have not mastered basic literacy or numeracy. Unfortunately, there are also not enough
teachers around to remedy these two problems. As we know that “Educated mass of any
country acts as a backbone of development”. Education is considered one of the most
powerful instruments for reducing poverty and inequality. Education provides a platform to
enhance a country’s competitiveness in the global economy thereby ensuring access to quality education for all, particularly to the underprivileged population is key to economic and social development. We desperately need teachers if we are full of these human rights and achieve universal primary and secondary education for all by 2030 and ” not just teachers but well trained and qualified teachers”. Increasing the supply of qualified teachers also poses a problem of a qualitative nature. A major challenge for teacher education in the twenty-first century is to provide social and qualified teachers to teach and prepare the next generation of citizens. Substantially increasing the supply of qualified teachers” is the biggest reason for “the shortage of qualified teachers”.

Effect of Shortage of Qualified Teachers

An article by Jaze Eze noted that a shortage of qualified teachers harms students, teachers, and the public education system as a whole. The lack of sufficient, qualified teachers and staff instability threaten students’ ability to learn and reduce teachers’ effectiveness, and the high teachers turnover consumes economic resources that could be better deployed elsewhere. The qualified teacher shortage makes it more difficult to build a solid reputation for teaching and professionalize it. Which further contributes to perpetuating the shortage. In addition, the fact that the shortage is distributed so unevenly among students of different socio-economic backgrounds challenges the U.S. education system’s goal of providing a sound education equitably to all children. the published estimates of the increasing qualified teachers shortage further understand the magnitude of the problem because the estimate doesn’t reflect the fact that the shortage of qualified teachers is not spread evenly among all schools but is more acute in high poverty schools. while we don’t have specific estimates of the shortage in low. We can infer the greater shortage of highly qualified teachers in high-poverty schools from the following premises and from our own data analyses. First, highly qualified teachers are in higher demand and therefore tend to have more options with respect to where they want to teach. They are more likely to be recruited by a high-income school in the district to join the staff of the school that provides them with better support and working condition and more choice of grades and subjects to teach.
Conclusion
There is no sign that the large shortage of qualified teachers overall and especially in highpoverty schools will go away. In light of the harm this shortage creates as well as its size and trends, it is critical to understand the nature of the problems and the complexity of the teacher labor market. Only when we understand the factors that contribute to the growing shortage of highly qualified teachers can we design policy intervention and better guide institutional decisions to find the missing teachers. As a first to explore the shortage of qualified teachers, it is important to acknowledge that qualified teachers shortage is the result of multiple and independent drivers, all working simultaneously to cause the imbalance between the number of newly qualified teachers needed (Demand) and the number of individuals available to be hired (Supply) but both supply-side and demand sides of the labor market for teachers are products of existing working condition, existing policies, and other factors. If these change, this can in turn drive in the demand and supply of qualified teachers and affect the size(existence) of the shortage of qualified teachers. Qualified teachers are needed to eliminate all these problems, therefore, the government should remove the shortage of qualified teachers as soon as possible. As a result of this, the maximum problems of society will end.

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